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Passing out the pizzas

Article by By The Associated Press | Wednesday, Jul 9, 2014 | Updated 10:18 AM CDT

Source: http://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/national-international/Frontier-Airlines-Pilot-Pizza-Delay-Dominos-Pizza-266363311.html#ixzz370N4JBoD
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Cheyenne Domino’s Pizza manager Andrew Ritchie told The Associated Press that he got a call about 10 p.m. Monday just as he was about to send employees home. Ritchie said the pilot told him he needed to feed 160 people — fast. Faced with potentially hungry — and grumpy — passengers, a Frontier Airlines pilot treated them to pizza when storms diverted a Denver-bound flight to Cheyenne, where the plane was stuck for a couple of hours.

“I put my hand over the phone and I said: ‘Guys, you’re coming back,’ ” Ritchie said, recalling what he told his employees.

In all, Ritchie said his crew made about 35 pizzas and delivered them to the airport, where the driver handed the food off to flight attendants. One of the passengers sent KUSA-TV a picture of flight attendants handing pizza boxes to people.

That number of pizzas is usually what his store handles in an entire hour, Ritchie said. This time, they needed to make them and deliver them in about 30 minutes, he said.

But that didn’t deter his co-workers, Ritchie said.

“Actually, they were super excited. They had a blast. It was a challenge,” he said. “It was definitely one of those ‘challenge accepted’ moments in time.”

Frontier Airlines did not immediately respond to an email from The Associated Press, but KUSA-TV said the company confirmed the episode.

The television station reports that the flight to Denver International Airport, which originated in Washington, D.C., left Cheyenne about 10:30 p.m., shortly after the pizzas arrived.

The flight was one of dozens that were delayed Monday evening because of heavy rain across Colorado.

Allen family gives PS4 to Dallas boy who donated smoke detectors to neighbors

Source: http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/Family-Gives-PS4-To-Generous-9-Year-Old-Boy-255955581.html#ixzz2zXA83nQP
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After giving up his savings to help others, a 9-year-old Dallas boy finally got his PlayStation 4 Sunday, thanks to a generous brother and sister from Collin County.
Hector Montoya saved up for about a year to buy a new PS4 gaming system but decided to put the money to a different use at the last minute: giving smoke detectors to those in need.
“I was going to buy a PlayStation but I decided saving a life was more important cause one life lost is too many,” said Montoya.
His grandmother said the idea came up after Hector heard a story on the news about a mother and child dying in a fire without a smoke detector. The boy was shocked to learn some folks didn’t have the safety system in their homes.
“Really it just hurt my heart,” he said.
On Saturday, Montoya and the Grand Prairie Fire Department installed about 100 smoke detectors he had donated into the homes of folks in need. When NBC 5 first covered the story, Hector simply said he planned to start saving again and hopefully get his PS4 eventually.
Within hours of the story airing, the NBC DFW Facebook page was filled with comments from people wanting to help the cause or see the young man’s kindness paid back, including from a brother and sister in Allen who were ready to do something right away.
Ashton and Peyton Harder immediately got to work with their mother and bought a PS4 that night to personally deliver to Hector.
“To see a 9-year-old worrying about so many others, you can’t help but want to give him what he wants,” said 19-year-old Ashton. “We thought that he deserved something special.”
On Sunday, the family drove the 45-minute trip to the Montoya home in Dallas and brought Hector the system.
“I was really excited,” said Montoya. “I didn’t know that this was going to happen, really I didn’t, but I was excited when I heard.”
“Once we turned the corner and pulled up we were like, OK this is, hopefully he’s excited and wants this,” said Ashton.
Needless to say, the 9-year-old was overjoyed to meet his new friends and set up the game system right away.
The game console wasn’t the only gift the Harders brought. The duo also brought Hector an extra $150 to help buy more smoke detectors and keep his cause going.
“It made me feel really good that I was helping him out with all of this and that we gave him extra money,” said 14-year-old Peyton Harder.
Montoya said he plans to continue saving and donating money to give smoke detectors to folks who need them.

Mother of three, nearly struck by car, not so angry anymore after anonymous driver says he’s sorry

By Lisa Fernandez | Friday, Apr 4, 2014 | Updated 6:55 PM PDT

Julie Colwell was out jogging Thursday morning, as she does every morning, when she was cut off in the crosswalk by a passing car.

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“I was like, ‘You jerk! Pay attention!’” Colwell recalled. “I yelled, ‘What do you think you’re doing?’ I was fuming.”

But the 42-year-old Sunnyvale, Calif., mother of three had a sudden change of heart Friday morning.

She said she found an apology note taped to the crosswalk pole near Cherry Chase Elementary School, the exact spot where she had nearly been hit the day before.

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The note was written in red marker, and left unsigned.

“To the woman I cut off yesterday, I am incredibly sorry for doing so,” the note read. “I am wracked with guilt over the thought I could have injured you. Thank you for the wake up call to give driving my full attention. Sorry!”

Colwell said that as soon as she saw the note, she knew it was intended for her.

She said she dropped any lingering anger she had for the mystery motorist, whom she described as a man who looked like he was driving his kid to school.

“Of course I forgive you,” Colwell told NBC Bay Area, as if she were speaking to the driver. “Thanks so much for owning it. We need more of that.”

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Cop confronts pit bull, pit bull loves cop, all is right in the world

8/14/2013

When a cop responds to a “vicious dog” call and arrives to find a pit bull, things often don’t turn out well. When Baltimore officer Dan Waskeiwicz showed up to just such a situation in May of 2012, the pit bull he encountered was anything but vicious. Waskeiwicz followed the dog into an alley, where it approached him, tail between its legs. The pit bull licked his pants. The cop gave him a bottle of water. And the love affair began. He bundled the sweetie into his squad car, took him to the shelter, and then decided to take him home. He named him Bo, and now the allegedly vicious dog lives with Waskeiwicz and his two other dogs. Happily, we hope, ever after. Good cop, good dog.

Source: http://www.deathandtaxesmag.com/203596/baltimore-police-officer-got-a-call-about-a-vicious-pit-bull-and-this-is-what-happened-next/

$64,000 Raised So Far For Homeless Man Who Turned In $42,000

September 18, 2013 9:30 AM
 

This week’s feel good story of the homeless man in Boston who found a backpack containing $42,000 in cash and travelers checks and then turned it into authorities is developing into an even better tale.

An online fundraiser to collect money for that Good Samaritan, who we now know is named Glen James , had raised nearly $64,000 as of 9:20 a.m. ET Wednesday.

The Boston Homeless Man Reward Campaign was launched by Ethan Whittington of Midlothian, Va., who hasn’t met James, but felt compelled to see if other Good Samaritans would “help this man change his life.”

James was honored this week by the Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis “for his extraordinary show of character and honesty.”

According to the Boston Globe:

“James, a slight, bespectacled man in his mid-50s who says he has been homeless for five years, said the thought of keeping the money never crossed his mind.

” ‘Even if I were desperate for money, I would not have kept even a penny of the money found,’ he said Monday in a handwritten statement. ‘God has always very well looked after me.’ “

The Globe adds that “in his statement, James wrote about how he found the money and a bit about himself. He had worked at a courthouse for 13 years as a file clerk, he said, before being fired. On Monday, the courts could not immediately confirm his employment. James could have gotten another job, he said, but he suffers from an inner-ear disorder that causes prolonged vertigo spells.”

The money he found last weekend belonged to a student from China who was visiting Boston. It was returned to the student.

 
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GREAT HEART’: A homeless good Samaritan flagged police after finding a backpack full of money on Saturday.
Monday, September 16, 2013
 

A homeless good Samaritan who turned in a lost backpack stuffed with nearly $42,000 yesterday was hailed by his fellow down-and-outers as a guy with a “great heart.”

“People will probably tell him he’s nuts, but homeless people are the first to help you out,” said Bob Boisselle, who, like the nameless humanitarian, stays at the city’s Long Island Shelter on Boston Harbor. “They don’t have anything, but they’ll give you what they do have.”

On Saturday night, Boston police said, the man turned in a lost backpack he had found at South Bay Mall in Dorchester — a backpack Boston police said contained $2,400 cash and $39,500 in American Express Travelers Cheques.

The man, who police declined to identify by name, flagged down officers and told them he found the black backpack in front of T.J. Maxx.

“He’s got a great heart,” said Aaron Toye, who stays at a different shelter in the city. “He did the right thing.”

Police said in addition to the money, the backpack contained passports “and various personal papers.”

Police were contacted an hour later by a mall customer reporting he’d lost a backpack “containing a large sum of money.”

Police said the rightful owner was identified by his Republic of China passport and the property was returned to him.

The anonymous hero must have acted out of a keen sense of empathy, his fellow street-dwellers said yesterday as the story made its way around the city’s shelters and alleys.

“Homeless people,” said Boisselle, a former western Massachusetts landscape designer who has been on the streets since 2005, “know what it’s like to be down and out.”

Police were contacted an hour later by a mall customer reporting he’d lost a backpack “containing a large sum of money.”

Police said the rightful owner was identified by his Republic of China passport and the property was returned to him.

The anonymous hero must have acted out of a keen sense of empathy, his fellow street-dwellers said yesterday as the story made its way around the city’s shelters and alleys.

“Homeless people,” said Boisselle, a former western Massachusetts landscape designer who has been on the streets since 2005, “know what it’s like to be down and out.”

- See more at: http://bostonherald.com/news_opinion/local_coverage/2013/09/fellow_homeless_hail_pal_who_turned_in_backpack_with_42g#sthash.ZSBrKbdz.dpuf

Police were contacted an hour later by a mall customer reporting he’d lost a backpack “containing a large sum of money.”

Police said the rightful owner was identified by his Republic of China passport and the property was returned to him.

The anonymous hero must have acted out of a keen sense of empathy, his fellow street-dwellers said yesterday as the story made its way around the city’s shelters and alleys.

“Homeless people,” said Boisselle, a former western Massachusetts landscape designer who has been on the streets since 2005, “know what it’s like to be down and out.”

- See more at: http://bostonherald.com/news_opinion/local_coverage/2013/09/fellow_homeless_hail_pal_who_turned_in_backpack_with_42g#sthash.ZSBrKbdz.dpuf

GREAT HEART’: A homeless good Samaritan flagged police after finding a backpack full of money on Saturday.
1
Monday, September 16, 2013
 

A homeless good Samaritan who turned in a lost backpack stuffed with nearly $42,000 yesterday was hailed by his fellow down-and-outers as a guy with a “great heart.”

“People will probably tell him he’s nuts, but homeless people are the first to help you out,” said Bob Boisselle, who, like the nameless humanitarian, stays at the city’s Long Island Shelter on Boston Harbor. “They don’t have anything, but they’ll give you what they do have.”

On Saturday night, Boston police said, the man turned in a lost backpack he had found at South Bay Mall in Dorchester — a backpack Boston police said contained $2,400 cash and $39,500 in American Express Travelers Cheques.

The man, who police declined to identify by name, flagged down officers and told them he found the black backpack in front of T.J. Maxx.

“He’s got a great heart,” said Aaron Toye, who stays at a different shelter in the city. “He did the right thing.”

Police said in addition to the money, the backpack contained passports “and various personal papers.”

- See more at: http://bostonherald.com/news_opinion/local_coverage/2013/09/fellow_homeless_hail_pal_who_turned_in_backpack_with_42g#sthash.ZSBrKbdz.dpuf

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By Danielle Genet

Larry Swilling, 78, marched around his town of Anderson, S.C., for more than a year  carrying a sign around his neck with the words: “NEED KIDNEY 4 WIFE.”

Swilling’s dogged appeal eventually found a kidney for his wife, Jimmie Sue. It also attracted enough donors to provide kidneys for 125 other people as well.

The Swillings have been married for 57 years and when Larry found out he was not a match to donate a kidney to his wife, who is 76, he was determined to find one and began his sandwich board plea.

The Medical University of South Carolina confirmed to ABC News a kidney donor has been matched with Mrs. Swilling and she will undergo surgery on Wednesday, Sept. 11.

Sarah Parker, RN Living Donor Coordinator at MUSC, said Larry Swilling’s effort to find a donor created an outpouring of donations.

“Over the course of the year 2,000 phone calls came in for his specific case,” Parker said. Mrs. Swilling and the potential donors went through tests to find a compatible match, and ultimately a match was found.

While many potential donors did not match, some of those initial calls resulted in an estimated 125 successful kidney donations registered at MUSC within the year.  Many of those are donors do not know the recipient of their kidney, but chose to donate anyway.

“Becoming a living donor is a great option because it takes away the wait time for those in need, it’s a blessing and gift for the recipient and their families, and helps bring down the national wait list,” Parker told ABC News.

Larry Swilling posted his phone number on the sandwich board sign and his inbox has been inundated with messages over the year. On his voice mail, Swilling gives his callers the phone number to the MUSC donation line at 1-800-277-8687 and thanks his callers for their interest and help.

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