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Homeless Good Samaritan

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GREAT HEART’: A homeless good Samaritan flagged police after finding a backpack full of money on Saturday.
Monday, September 16, 2013
 

A homeless good Samaritan who turned in a lost backpack stuffed with nearly $42,000 yesterday was hailed by his fellow down-and-outers as a guy with a “great heart.”

“People will probably tell him he’s nuts, but homeless people are the first to help you out,” said Bob Boisselle, who, like the nameless humanitarian, stays at the city’s Long Island Shelter on Boston Harbor. “They don’t have anything, but they’ll give you what they do have.”

On Saturday night, Boston police said, the man turned in a lost backpack he had found at South Bay Mall in Dorchester — a backpack Boston police said contained $2,400 cash and $39,500 in American Express Travelers Cheques.

The man, who police declined to identify by name, flagged down officers and told them he found the black backpack in front of T.J. Maxx.

“He’s got a great heart,” said Aaron Toye, who stays at a different shelter in the city. “He did the right thing.”

Police said in addition to the money, the backpack contained passports “and various personal papers.”

Police were contacted an hour later by a mall customer reporting he’d lost a backpack “containing a large sum of money.”

Police said the rightful owner was identified by his Republic of China passport and the property was returned to him.

The anonymous hero must have acted out of a keen sense of empathy, his fellow street-dwellers said yesterday as the story made its way around the city’s shelters and alleys.

“Homeless people,” said Boisselle, a former western Massachusetts landscape designer who has been on the streets since 2005, “know what it’s like to be down and out.”

Police were contacted an hour later by a mall customer reporting he’d lost a backpack “containing a large sum of money.”

Police said the rightful owner was identified by his Republic of China passport and the property was returned to him.

The anonymous hero must have acted out of a keen sense of empathy, his fellow street-dwellers said yesterday as the story made its way around the city’s shelters and alleys.

“Homeless people,” said Boisselle, a former western Massachusetts landscape designer who has been on the streets since 2005, “know what it’s like to be down and out.”

– See more at: http://bostonherald.com/news_opinion/local_coverage/2013/09/fellow_homeless_hail_pal_who_turned_in_backpack_with_42g#sthash.ZSBrKbdz.dpuf

Police were contacted an hour later by a mall customer reporting he’d lost a backpack “containing a large sum of money.”

Police said the rightful owner was identified by his Republic of China passport and the property was returned to him.

The anonymous hero must have acted out of a keen sense of empathy, his fellow street-dwellers said yesterday as the story made its way around the city’s shelters and alleys.

“Homeless people,” said Boisselle, a former western Massachusetts landscape designer who has been on the streets since 2005, “know what it’s like to be down and out.”

– See more at: http://bostonherald.com/news_opinion/local_coverage/2013/09/fellow_homeless_hail_pal_who_turned_in_backpack_with_42g#sthash.ZSBrKbdz.dpuf

GREAT HEART’: A homeless good Samaritan flagged police after finding a backpack full of money on Saturday.
1
Monday, September 16, 2013

 

A homeless good Samaritan who turned in a lost backpack stuffed with nearly $42,000 yesterday was hailed by his fellow down-and-outers as a guy with a “great heart.”

“People will probably tell him he’s nuts, but homeless people are the first to help you out,” said Bob Boisselle, who, like the nameless humanitarian, stays at the city’s Long Island Shelter on Boston Harbor. “They don’t have anything, but they’ll give you what they do have.”

On Saturday night, Boston police said, the man turned in a lost backpack he had found at South Bay Mall in Dorchester — a backpack Boston police said contained $2,400 cash and $39,500 in American Express Travelers Cheques.

The man, who police declined to identify by name, flagged down officers and told them he found the black backpack in front of T.J. Maxx.

“He’s got a great heart,” said Aaron Toye, who stays at a different shelter in the city. “He did the right thing.”

Police said in addition to the money, the backpack contained passports “and various personal papers.”

– See more at: http://bostonherald.com/news_opinion/local_coverage/2013/09/fellow_homeless_hail_pal_who_turned_in_backpack_with_42g#sthash.ZSBrKbdz.dpuf

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By Danielle Genet

Larry Swilling, 78, marched around his town of Anderson, S.C., for more than a year  carrying a sign around his neck with the words: “NEED KIDNEY 4 WIFE.”

Swilling’s dogged appeal eventually found a kidney for his wife, Jimmie Sue. It also attracted enough donors to provide kidneys for 125 other people as well.

The Swillings have been married for 57 years and when Larry found out he was not a match to donate a kidney to his wife, who is 76, he was determined to find one and began his sandwich board plea.

The Medical University of South Carolina confirmed to ABC News a kidney donor has been matched with Mrs. Swilling and she will undergo surgery on Wednesday, Sept. 11.

Sarah Parker, RN Living Donor Coordinator at MUSC, said Larry Swilling’s effort to find a donor created an outpouring of donations.

“Over the course of the year 2,000 phone calls came in for his specific case,” Parker said. Mrs. Swilling and the potential donors went through tests to find a compatible match, and ultimately a match was found.

While many potential donors did not match, some of those initial calls resulted in an estimated 125 successful kidney donations registered at MUSC within the year.  Many of those are donors do not know the recipient of their kidney, but chose to donate anyway.

“Becoming a living donor is a great option because it takes away the wait time for those in need, it’s a blessing and gift for the recipient and their families, and helps bring down the national wait list,” Parker told ABC News.

Larry Swilling posted his phone number on the sandwich board sign and his inbox has been inundated with messages over the year. On his voice mail, Swilling gives his callers the phone number to the MUSC donation line at 1-800-277-8687 and thanks his callers for their interest and help.

Yesterday I posted about some young men who got caught on camera in a store. Here’s a follow-up article:

If character is what you do when no one is watching, a group of William Paterson University freshman football players proved the saying true.

On Sunday, the manager of Buddy’s Small Lots in Wayne, N.J., was alerted by police that there had been a break-in at the store. Video surveillance footage showed four young men entering and then leaving with several items in hand. However, a closer look at the footage caught the men on tape doing the right thing: Leaving the exact money for the items, tax included, at the register.

The honest shoppers, Thomas James, Anthony Biondi, Kell’e Gallimore and Jelani Bruce, were rewarded with $50 of free merchandise by the store’s managers. The players spoke about their story on TODAY Wednesday.

“(We’re) just ecstatic knowing that one good deed blew up nationwide and now everyone’s hearing about it,’’ Biondi told Matt Lauer, Savannah Guthrie and Tamron Hall.

“My dad keeps calling saying, ‘Oh my God, you really did that?’’’ Bruce said.

The lights in the store were on because of a quirk in the lighting system and the door lock was broken, according to the store managers. Thinking the store was open, the players waited for a clerk to appear, not realizing they had tripped the alarm.

“We were scared,’’ Bruce said. “Honestly, we thought it was a Halloween gag or something. We thought someone was going to come out and say, ‘Ah, gotcha! Welcome to the store.’’’

The men had stopped in between preseason practice sessions to pick up a $4 pack of batteries and a $1 audio cable for dorm speakers.

“We had to get back to practice, so they just showed the money to the cameras, put it down and we just left,’’ Biondi told TODAY.

The store’s vice president rushed over after police reported a break-in, only to be pleasantly surprised.

“His jaw dropped when he realized these kids did do some shopping, but that they paid for everything that they took,’’ store manager Marci Lederman told TODAY. “I think it’s terrific that there are still people out there that have moral character not to do the wrong thing when they easily could.”

Word soon spread about the good deed, and it appeared on a local newscast.

“Soon as I went on my laptop, it was like right there, front page, and I was just excited,’’ Gallimore said. “I was like smiling because I was like, ‘Oh I’m famous.’’’

 

 

SWEET: Finally someone caught on tape doing the right thing!

Several shoppers entered a store in New Jersey to make some purchases – but there was no clerk around because it turns out the door was mistakenly left open. The store was actually closed.

The men made their selections, waited for a cashier and finally gave up.

So they added up their own bill and left the money on the counter.

The store owner was so appreciative that he tracked the men down and invited them back today for a free shopping spree.

Thanks, Zamir!

On February 1st, 2013 students at Stony Brook University surprised Zamir, an employee who works the night shift at the local Dunkin Donuts. Check out the great video they made to commemorate the occasion:

Published January 20, 2013 FoxNews.com

Usually, when a waiter refuses to serve someone at a restaurant, customers complain. In this case, customers cheered.

The waiter in question, Michael Garcia, has been receiving goodwill and friend requests on the restaurant’s Facebook page since word spread that he stood up for a child with special needs.

Garcia, who works at the Houston restaurant Laurenzo’s, was waiting on a family, regulars with a 5-year-old child, Milo, who has Down syndrome. The server said that another family at the restaurant commented on Milo’s behavior, which Garcia described as “talking and making little noises.” Garcia moved the complaining family to another table, but they were still unhappy. “Special needs children need to be special somewhere else,” the father reportedly said.

The waiter then took a stand. He told FoxNews.com that such talk is ignorant and is due to people’s fear of the unknown. “My personal feelings took over,” he said, leading him to tell the father, “Sir, I won’t be able to serve you.” The family left the restaurant.

It didn’t take long for the story to get out. The eatery’s Facebook page has received praise from people in Texas and beyond.

Facebook user Tisha Baker wrote, “Thank you so much for speaking up when most just turn away.”

Rick Park posted, “Thank you Mr. Garcia, I have a 17 year old son with Down syndrome and I love to hear about people like yourself standing up for people with disabilities.”

Stephanie Painter added, “Thank you Michael for standing up for this beautiful little boy! Anyone who has ever come in contact with a child, or adult, with Down’s knows how loving and happy they are. Milo is a precious gift from God and so is Michael!”

Outside of Texas, Garcia gained other fans. Sue Pusztai posted, “I wish I lived in Texas so I could eat at your restaurant. I would loved to have met Mr. Garcia and thank him for his compassion and courage.”

Grateful mom of Milo, Kim Castillo, added her thanks online the night of the incident on a friend’s Facebook page: “Yay for people like Michael … who not only love (my son) Milo for who he is — a customer and little boy with Down syndrome, but stand up for him no matter what.”

 

FoxNews.com’s Alexandria Hein contributed to this report. 

 

At the age of 51, lawyer Tony Tolbert decided to move back into his parents house just so a homeless family could move into his own. This unbelievable act of kindness just has to be seen! This man is truly an angel.

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